Licensing vs Accreditation

Licensing

  • Licensing standards vary from state to state. The Utah licensing entity is the Department of Health, Bureau of Child Development.
  • The goal is to ensure the safety and well-being of children. Minimum standards are set by government regulatory agencies, with input from professionals and community.
  • Licensing rules are established to determine the least that can be provided to assure safe, healthy, nurturing environment for children's care and development.
  • Accountable to report major changes.
  • All providers must pass a criminal background check and attain the minimal hours of required training.
  • License expires & providers must renew license at set times established by the licensor.
  • Inspections are done both announced and unannounced biannually.

Types of Licensing

  • Residential Certificate - Child care provided in a private home for up to eight children. This can include up to (but not more than) two children under the age of two.
  • Family Child Care - Child care provided in a private home for up to eight children. This can include up to (but not more than) two children under the age of two Family Group Child Care
  • Family Group Child Care - Child care provided in a private home and operated by two providers who care for up to 16 children (including their own).
  • Child Care Center - Child care provided in a non-residential setting on a regular schedule. The number of children allowed will be determined by the facility's total square footage.
  • Hourly Center - Child care provided in a non-residential setting, not on a regular schedule.

License Exempt

  • Nanny Care
  • Relative Care
  • Programs administered by public or parochial schools
  • Drop-in programs where the parents are on premises (i.e. playgroups, gym, church, etc.)

Accreditation

  • National standards created by national groups to meet a higher level of quality.
  • Set by professionals in Early Childhood Education; intended as standards of excellence that is most often higher than licensing regulations.
  • Child care programs voluntarily become accredited as it is not mandated by law.
  • Established to determine the best that can be provided to facilitate optimal growth and development.
  • Staff engage in continued education and professional development.
  • Annual report of changes and improvements.
  • Accreditation expires/must be reaccredited.

Types of Accreditation

  • National Association for Family Child Care (NAFCC)
  • National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC)
    • Child care centers, Kindergartens, public school preschools.
    • www.naeyc.org or call 1-800-424-2460
  • National Early Childhood Program Accreditation
  • National AfterSchool Association